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Pain in the Posture

As a personal trainer with expertise in postural assessment and correction, I can attest to the importance of using assessments such as the Overhead Squat Assessment to identify compensation patterns and other postural dysfunctions that can lead to pain and discomfort.


One common example of postural dysfunction is asymmetrical weight shift, which occurs when one side of the body bears more weight than the other. This can lead to imbalances in the muscles of the legs, hips, and around the spine, which can contribute to back pain and other issues.


Through the Overhead Squat Assessment, we can identify this dysfunction and develop corrective exercises to address it, such as lunges or step-ups with a focus on balancing weight distribution.





Another example of postural dysfunction is excessive forward lean, which can contribute to neck and back pain, as well as poor balance and decreased mobility. The Overhead Squat Assessment can help us identify this issue, and we can work on corrective exercises such as deadlifts and glute bridges to strengthen the posterior chain muscles and improve posture.





Anterior Pelvic tilt is yet another common postural dysfunction that can contribute to lower back pain, hip pain, and poor posture. Through the Overhead Squat Assessment, we can identify this issue and develop a corrective exercise program that focuses on strengthening the glutes, hamstrings, and core muscles, as well as stretching the hip flexors and quadriceps.


Using assessments such as the Overhead Squat Assessment to identify postural dysfunctions and compensation patterns, we can create a targeted corrective exercise program that addresses these issues and helps alleviate pain and discomfort. It's important to note that correcting postural dysfunction takes time and consistent effort, but the benefits of good posture are well worth it - improved mobility, reduced pain, and better overall health and well-being.



Do you think you have postural dysfunction?

  • Yes

  • No

  • Not sure


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