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  • Writer's pictureJason Rotteveel, PTS HWL PPSC

Groaning over Groin Injuries





If you're a hockey player, a groin pull can be a major setback in your game. It can keep you off the ice for weeks, and even after you've recovered, it can impact your performance and increase the risk of re-injury. That's why it's essential to have a recovery program that's tailored to your needs as a hockey player.

In this blog, I will provide a detailed groin pull recovery program that's designed specifically for hockey players. I'll cover the causes of groin pulls, the symptoms to look out for, and the steps you can take to recover as quickly and safely as possible.

Causes of Groin Pulls in Hockey Players

Groin pulls are a common injury among hockey players. They occur when the muscles of the inner thigh are stretched or torn, usually as a result of sudden movements or changes of direction. Some common causes of groin pulls in hockey players include:

  • Quick turns and stops: When you're skating at high speeds and need to change direction quickly, it puts a lot of strain on the muscles of the inner thigh.

  • Sliding: When you slide across the ice on your knees, it can cause friction and strain on the groin muscles.

  • Sudden acceleration: When you need to accelerate quickly, it can put a lot of stress on the muscles of the inner thigh.

  • Direct impact: If you get hit in the groin area by a stick, puck, or another player, it can cause a groin pull.

Symptoms of a Groin Pull in Hockey Players

If you've experienced a groin pull, you know how painful it can be. Some common symptoms of a groin pull in hockey players include:

  • Pain or tenderness in the inner thigh or groin area

  • Swelling or bruising

  • Difficulty moving the leg or hip

  • Stiffness or tightness in the muscles

  • Weakness or instability in the leg

If you experience any of these symptoms, it's important to seek medical attention as soon as possible. A healthcare professional can evaluate the severity of your injury and provide guidance on the best course of treatment.

Groin Pull Recovery Program for Hockey Players

Recovering from a groin pull can take several weeks, and it's essential to have a recovery program that's tailored to your needs as a hockey player. Here's a sample groin pull recovery program that's designed specifically for hockey players:

Phase 1: Rest and Pain Management (Days 1-3)

The first phase of a groin pull recovery program is focused on rest and pain management. During this phase, it's important to avoid any activities that cause pain or discomfort and to take steps to reduce inflammation and pain.

  1. Rest: Rest the affected area and avoid any activities that cause pain or discomfort. This may mean taking a break from hockey for a few days or weeks, depending on the severity of your injury.

  2. Ice: Apply ice to the affected area for 20 minutes at a time, several times a day, to reduce swelling and pain.

  3. Compression: Wrap the affected area with an elastic bandage to provide support and reduce swelling.

  4. Elevation: Elevate the affected area above heart level to reduce swelling and pain.

  5. Pain Relief: Take over-the-counter pain medications, such as ibuprofen or acetaminophen, as directed by your healthcare provider.


Phase 2: Rehabilitation Exercises (Days 4-14)

The second phase of a groin pull recovery program is focused on rehabilitation exercises. During this phase, it's important to gradually reintroduce activity and movement while continuing to manage pain and inflammation.

  1. Stretching: Perform gentle stretching exercises for the affected muscles, such as the adductors and hip flexors, to improve range of motion and flexibility. Hold each stretch for 20-30 seconds and repeat several times a day.

  2. Strengthening: Once you've regained some mobility, start to incorporate strengthening exercises for the affected muscles. Some effective exercises for hockey players include squats, lunges, leg presses, and hip bridges. Start with light weights and gradually increase the intensity as you feel more comfortable.

  3. Balance and Stability: As you start to regain strength and mobility, incorporate balance and stability exercises into your routine. These can include single-leg squats, lateral lunges, and stability ball exercises. These exercises can help to improve your balance and reduce the risk of reinjury.

  4. Cardiovascular Exercise: As you start to feel more comfortable with activity, start to incorporate cardiovascular exercise into your routine. This can include low-impact activities such as cycling or swimming. Start with short sessions and gradually increase the duration and intensity as you feel more comfortable.

  5. Ice and Heat Therapy: Continue to use ice and heat therapy as needed to manage pain and inflammation. Ice the affected area after activity to reduce swelling, and use heat therapy before activity to improve mobility and flexibility.

Phase 3: Return to Sport (Days 15-21)

The final phase of a groin pull recovery program is focused on returning to sport. During this phase, it's important to gradually reintroduce hockey-specific activities while continuing to manage pain and inflammation.

  1. Skating Drills: Start with basic skating drills, such as forwards and backwards skating, and gradually incorporate more complex movements, such as quick turns and stops.

  2. Stickhandling: Once you feel comfortable with skating, start to incorporate stickhandling drills into your routine. Focus on maintaining proper form and technique to reduce the risk of reinjury.

  3. Shooting: Once you feel comfortable with stickhandling, start to incorporate shooting drills into your routine. Start with light shots and gradually increase the intensity as you feel more comfortable.

  4. Full Contact Drills: Once you feel comfortable with skating, stickhandling, and shooting, start to incorporate full contact drills into your routine. Start with light contact and gradually increase the intensity as you feel more comfortable.

  5. Gradual Return: Gradually return to full game play over the course of several weeks. Start with short shifts and gradually increase the duration and intensity as you feel more comfortable.

Recovering from a groin pull can be a frustrating and challenging experience for hockey players. BUT!





A proper conditioning program like JFT Hockey can be a valuable addition to a groin pull recovery program for hockey players. JFT Hockey is a comprehensive training program designed specifically for hockey players, focusing on improving strength, speed, agility, and endurance.


By incorporating JFT Hockey into your training routine, you can improve your overall strength and stability, which can reduce the risk of groin pulls and other injuries. This is because the program emphasizes proper technique and form, which can further reduce the risk of injury.


Additionally, JFT Hockey can also be helpful in improving recovery from groin pulls and other injuries. The program includes specific exercises and drills that can help to improve mobility, strength, and stability in the affected area. This can speed up the healing process and reduce the risk of re-injury.


Beyond injury prevention and recovery, JFT Hockey can also improve your overall performance on the ice. By improving your strength, speed, agility, and endurance, you can skate faster, shoot harder, and outperform your opponents. This can give you a significant advantage on the ice and help you to achieve your goals as a hockey player.


While a proper recovery program is crucial for overcoming groin pulls, a comprehensive conditioning program like JFT Hockey can significantly improve your recovery and prevent future injuries. By taking a proactive approach to your training, you can improve your performance, reduce the risk of injury, and achieve your full potential as a hockey player.


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